• As some of you know, the old forum database was deleted by the previous administrator. I am attempting to paste any retrievable discussions back into this forum using the internet archive. It won't look pretty - but at least we can preserve some valuable information. Feel free to add to the discussions as these old posts are restored.

Italian Remote-Controlled Bomb

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Posted 21 May 2013 by fredleander

This has probably been up before but it was news to me. In Garello's book on the Breda Ba.65 there were several pictures of a Ba.65 with a remote-controlled bomb under the belly It was fitted into a purpose-shaped "room". According to the picture text tests took place in 1938. Anybody know where more can be found about this?

Fred

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Posted 21 May 2013 by Dili

View Postfredleander, on 21 May 2013 - 01:53 PM, said:

This has probably been up before but it was news to me. In Garello's book on the Breda Ba.65 there were several pictures of a Ba.65 with a remote-controlled bomb under the belly It was fitted into a purpose-shaped "room". According to the picture text tests took place in 1938. Anybody know where more can be found about this?

Fred

Can you post the picture?

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Posted 22 May 2013 by fredleander
BredaRemoteBomb_zps6ea58c45.png
 

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Posted 22 May 2013 by Dili

Are you sure it is a remote-controlled bomb? It doesn't seem to have any controls.

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Posted 22 May 2013 by fredleander

View PostDili, on 22 May 2013 - 08:32 PM, said:
Are you sure it is a remote-controlled bomb? It doesn't seem to have any controls.



I am not sure about anything, just referring the picture text. Besides, an antenna can be seen sticking out of its rear. Also some small ailerons on the bomb fins. What is just as interesting is the custom-made fuselage belly with the bomb half-covered in its position. This picture was obviously taken when testing the release mechanism as there is a thick sand layer on the floor.

There is also another picture of a somewhat different bomb with small, forward-mounted wings. There the tail ailerons can be clearly seen. The text further says that drop tests were made at Malpensa/Milano in 1938 by technical pilot Niclot.


Fred

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Posted 23 May 2013 by Dili

The bomb in photo doesn't have ailerons that can control it.
The antenna at rear is not definitive of "anything"

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Posted 23 May 2013 by fredleander
BredaRemoteBomb3_zps902479cd.png


View PostDili, on 23 May 2013 - 11:57 AM, said:
The bomb in photo doesn't have ailerons that can control it.
The antenna at rear is not definitive of "anything"


Hi, Dili - you may be correct. The bomb in the picture could just be a device to test the release mechanism. Still the elaborate reworking of the underbelly of the aircraft points to some serious undertaking. Do you have any information on such a project?


Fred


P.S.: Well, this bomb certainly has movable fins in the rear - wings, too! He who can point out two pecularities in the picture to me shall get my book FREE provided he pays the freight - 85,- SEK. One is on the bomb, the other on the aircraft itself.
 

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Posted 23 May 2013 by Dili

That is a different one and I agree.

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Posted 24 May 2013 by fredleander




Anybody see the peculiarities I am asking about? One on the aircraft itself, the other on the flying bomb.....

Fred

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Posted 24 May 2013 by madmike

is a 'Bomba a Collisione' ) don't TRY translate as 'collision bomb' as literally... is a name difficult to understand even in Italian....)

Created by the gen. Gaetano Crocco, author of a winged bomb of 1917, which was dropped from airships and then beat after a preset time on the objective. The new bomb was similar and designed for dive bombers, but only two of the twelve specimens were tested by Ba.65. The project was developed in 1938.

Here is some information about Gaetano Crocco:

http://en.wikipedia....o_Arturo_Crocco

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Posted 24 May 2013 by fredleander




Thank you, Mike - what a fascinating personality Mr. Crocco was! That probably explains the gadget on the bottom of the bomb in my latest picture - they were rockets (not venturis) to actually propel the bomb! Since I have blown the riddle I might as well disclose the other mystery, too - namely that this 1938-model Ba.65 had genuine speed (air) brakes.


Fred
 
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