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Dog tag

jenfen

New Member
Not sure which area this comes under but here goes !!
I found an Italian soldier's WW2 dog tag amongst my late father's WW2 memorabilia which I believe he found in Germany in 1945. I would like to return the dog tag to the soldier's family where it truly belongs but I don't know how to go about tracing the family. I would be grateful for any help.
The soldier's name is Luigi Venditti and the number is 89038 . Other lettering is 922 MAAR on one side and 922 MAR on the other side. There is also C written at the bottom of both sides.
Thank you for your help.
 
It is really strange as a tag because in general the Italian tags of the time of the Second World War reported not only the name and surname of the soldier but also that of both the father and the mother with the maiden name, to facilitate a possible identification in case of homonyms. A letter was also reported for the type of religion practiced and the serial number which perhaps in this case corresponds with the ...... while the verse could be the date of birth. The plate was doubled and both were supported by a chain and were worn around the neck. At the time of death one was torn and kept by the highest non-commissioned officer / officer at the time and the other was buried with the body ....
All the best
Maurizio
 

jenfen

New Member
It is really strange as a tag because in general the Italian tags of the time of the Second World War reported not only the name and surname of the soldier but also that of both the father and the mother with the maiden name, to facilitate a possible identification in case of homonyms. A letter was also reported for the type of religion practiced and the serial number which perhaps in this case corresponds with the ...... while the verse could be the date of birth. The plate was doubled and both were supported by a chain and were worn around the neck. At the time of death one was torn and kept by the highest non-commissioned officer / officer at the time and the other was buried with the body ....
All the best
Maurizio
Thank you Maurizio for such interesting information. I should have said that there are 2 metal discs and both are on a chain, back to back. Any ideas as to what I should do with the dog tag as I'm sure it would be a precious item for the soldier's family to have ? Would it help to attach a photo ?
 
Yes if you can attach a photo it could help ..... it could also be a plate of an Italian soldier enlisted in the wermacht after September 8 but it would still be a plate of a different shape. Class I am sure the family would like to have it back ....
All the best
Maurizio
 
Now I can tell you with certainty that this is not a plaque of the Royal Army but most likely a plaque of a prisoner of war in the American concentration camp (as evidenced by the date of birth .... American style .... 9 -22-1922 -22 September 1922- if it had been Italian it would certainly have been 22-9-1922- in addition it is round while the plates of the Royal Army were rectangular or square, it does not have the authorship or indication of the mother and is made on a smooth background not on a knurled background. I understand that it was so, I don't have the mathematical certainty but it is highly likely that it was so ....... the 5-digit numerator is certainly the serial number, perhaps that is of the Royal Army even if at the moment there were no military districts with such a high numbering could instead be the indicator of the detention camp number ... I would make an attempt in the existing fields in america at the time ....
All the best
Maurizio
 

jwsleser

Member
Staff member
I am not sure this is an American POW tag. If it was found in Germany, a US POW tag doesn't make sense.

Date: the tag is 922 MAR. This is not any American style I had seen before. It is of a style used in Italy and possibly other parts of Europe. Often the first numerical of the year is omitted (1)922. I have seen this in written Italian many times. When I first read the tag, I immediately thought 'March 1922'. I can't get a day, month, year from any combination from the info listed. There aren't enough digits.

Font of the lettering: This is very unusual font for anything American. Look at the bottom of the 'I' and 'T', the 'T' cross bar, and the ending of the 'G'. I have never seen anything like this.

Stamping: This is hand stamped. Americans would have used machinery to make POW tags.

The shape of the tag: this is more European than American. A round tag is something not often used by the US military.

The numerals (89038) could be an Italian serial number. It is the right number of numerals and you have the year (1922); the latter needed as the number sequence resets every year. So the serial number could be 1922 89038.

I would guess a German or Russian POW tag. Possibly an RSI tag, although I don't know enough about that army to say for sure.

Pista! Jeff
 
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jenfen

New Member
Thank you very much for all your help Maurizio, it's a fascinating story. I'll explore the American websites and see what I can come up with.
Jenny
 

jenfen

New Member
I am not sure this is an American POW tag. If it was found in Germany, a US POW doesn't make sense.

Date: the tag is 922 MAR. This is not any American style I had seen before. It is of a style used in Italy and possibly other parts of Europe. Often the first numerical of the year is omitted (1)922. I have seen this in written Italian many times. When I first read the tag, I immediately thought 'March 1922'. I can't get a day, month, year from any combination from the info listed. There aren't enough digits.

Font of the lettering: This is very unusual font for anything American. Look at the bottom of the 'I' and 'T', the 'T' cross bar, and the ending of the 'G'. I have never seen anything like this.

Stamping: This is hand stamped. Americans would have used machinery to make POW tags.

The shape of the tag: this is more European than American. A round tag is something not often used by the US military.

I would guess a German or Russian POW tag. Possibly an RSI tag, although I don't know enough about that army to say for sure.

Pista! Jeff
Thank you for the information. I think I may have been wrong about Germany as my father was also stationed in North Africa so he could have found it there.
Jenny
 

jwsleser

Member
Staff member
Jenny

If found in North Africa, a UK POW tag makes sense. The UK used a round dog tag.

I am not sure how you can find the family. If 1922 89038 is the soldier's serial number, that gives you some information. The problem is that the Italian military personal records from WW2 are held by the province/state archives. The Italian identification tag had the military district number stamped on it. That would tell you which province/state archive to contact. This tag doesn't have that information.

If Luigi Venditti was captured by the UK, look at the UK National Archives at Prisoners of War in British hands . Read paragraph 1, 2 and 7. That will give you a starting place.

Pista! Jeff
 

jenfen

New Member
Jenny

If found in North Africa, a UK POW tag makes sense. The UK used a round dog tag.

I am not sure how you can find the family. If 1922 89038 is the soldier's serial number, that gives you some information. The problem is that the Italian military personal records from WW2 are held by the province/state archives. The Italian identification tag had the military district number stamped on it. That would tell you which province/state archive to contact. This tag doesn't have that information.

If Luigi Venditti was captured by the UK, look at the UK National Archives at Prisoners of War in British hands . Read paragraph 1, 2 and 7. That will give you a starting place.

Pista! Jeff
Thank you, that's so helpful! I'll home in on the UK PoWs tomorrow and let you know how I get on.
Jenny
 
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