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OVRA parachutists

Bry

New Member
Jeff, have you checked "I paracadutisti italiani 1937/45" by Giuseppe Lundari? It is in Italian and English and provides useful information about all the Italian units of parachutists, in particular with regards to their uniforms and markings and, to a lesser extent, to their OOBs and their rather complex structure, given the several armed forces involved.
IIRC,it contains nothing about the OVRA unit.
 

Bry

New Member
Bry, honestly I have never read anything about an OVRA parachutist unit, may you provide us more information, please?
You aren't going to read anything about OVRA having a para unit.
They have been excluded from history.
I have seen a pic with a kangaroo,iirc,fitted with the oxygen masks for the Paras.
They had motorized bicycles that folded up as well.
 

DrG

Member
At first I thought that maybe "OVRA" were a mispelling for "ADRA" (Arditi Distruttori Regia Aeronautica), but I see that Bry looks sure about his information. Maybe he is referring to a secret intelligence unit, but again I have never read anything about it.

So, please, Bry tell us more about it. If you are writing something and wish to keep your sources for yourself until you will publish your study, please at least tell us when it will be published.
 

Bry

New Member
At first I thought that maybe "OVRA" were a mispelling for "ADRA" (Arditi Distruttori Regia Aeronautica), but I see that Bry looks sure about his information. Maybe he is referring to a secret intelligence unit, but again I have never read anything about it.

So, please, Bry tell us more about it. If you are writing something and wish to keep your sources for yourself until you will publish your study, please at least tell us when it will be published.
No, we will keep this a fact-based discussion. You are more than welcome to present facts to support your position. So far you have failed to do so.



Then how to do you know it exists? Someone told you about it? Mother, father, stranger on a street corner?

I guess you haven't noticed that many here use non-English language sources. Do you have any Italian sources that state the OVRA had a parachute unit? Done any research in the archives?

No, you haven't.



And why is this something that bears on the discussion?

You have a choice. You can participate here on Comando Supremo with intelligent discussion looking at facts or offering reasonable speculation that logically follow the facts you present. Or you can make another statement like the one you posted about Churchillian history.

You have yet to offer any post that that provides any reason for discussion or adds knowledge to this forum.

I will be interested in reading what you decide.
I knew the man very well.And he told me about having to use the oxygen a little,some others needed more.He was my father in law .
My friend,I could tell you about many things
The Allies made damned sure that most involved would never live to tell their story
His record is sealed.He escaped two death camps.He was never officially released.
I believe that I should leave it there for the time being.No hard feelings
 

Bry

New Member
At first I thought that maybe "OVRA" were a mispelling for "ADRA" (Arditi Distruttori Regia Aeronautica), but I see that Bry looks sure about his information. Maybe he is referring to a secret intelligence unit, but again I have never read anything about it.

So, please, Bry tell us more about it. If you are writing something and wish to keep your sources for yourself until you will publish your study, please at least tell us when it will be published.
I am torn about getting the story mainstream.
In his later life he was a well respected man.
During his military career,which went from 34-45,and then not returning home till 1950,many would only describe him with two words.

Selassie came to visit in Asmara and was thoroughly horrified.
 

DrG

Member
Bry, thanks for your messages, altought somewhat cryptic. I know other people who don't want to publish some of their discoveries about WW2, even though they are documented, because they fear for their reputation ("they will tell I am a fool"), or other serious reasons (information about intelligence, or about important families, etc.). Some topics are quite sensible also today and there will always be somebody who will question their authenticity. Yet, I suggest you to write everything you have discovered, clarifying very openly which are your sources and providing the photos of at least the most important documents (if you have any).
 
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Bry

New Member
Bry, thanks for your messages, altought somewhat cryptic. I know other people who don't want to publish some of their discoveries about WW2, even though they are documented, because they fear for their reputation ("they will tell I am a fool"), or other serious reasons (information about intelligence, or about important families, etc.). Some topics are quite sensible also today and there will always be somebody who will question their authenticity. Yet, I suggest you to write everything you have discovered, clarifying very openly which are your sources and providing the photos of at least the most important documents (if you have any).
Bundesarchivs .
Two pics trying to locate the second from the same day
 

DrG

Member
Well, better than nothing! By the way, the archives of the OVRA are lacking a lot of documents, as usual for any intelligence service, even more when sensitive matters, like Fascism and collaboration to it, are involved. So it is not a surprise if your research will be very difficult, but I suggest you to go on with it and be as objective and clear as possible when you will publish it, choosing a good review o publisher for it.

Just think about the several discoveries of very important documents in private hands, when old people from WW2 died and their heirs finally opened their drawers, trunks, etc. The most known case is that of the "Alicicco papers", i.e. the documents given to Alicicco, an officer of the Army, by King Humbert II upon his departure for Lisbon in 1946. The heirs gave those papers (copies of Mussolini's documents, probably from his bags when he was captured by partisans) to the Archivio Centrale dello Stato about 20 years ago, but the heirs of the other officers who had received similar dossiers from the King haven't done the same, with their documents probably lost or destroyed.
 

Bry

New Member
Well, better than nothing! By the way, the archives of the OVRA are lacking a lot of documents, as usual for any intelligence service, even more when sensitive matters, like Fascism and collaboration to it, are involved. So it is not a surprise if your research will be very difficult, but I suggest you to go on with it and be as objective and clear as possible when you will publish it, choosing a good review o publisher for it.

Just think about the several discoveries of very important documents in private hands, when old people from WW2 died and their heirs finally opened their drawers, trunks, etc. The most known case is that of the "Alicicco papers", i.e. the documents given to Alicicco, an officer of the Army, by King Humbert II upon his departure for Lisbon in 1946. The heirs gave those papers (copies of Mussolini's documents, probably from his bags when he was captured by partisans) to the Archivio Centrale dello Stato about 20 years ago, but the heirs of the other officers who had received similar dossiers from the King haven't done the same, with their documents probably lost or destroyed.
I wouldn't count on OVRA archives for anything.
They wrote down nothing and dog tags were not worn.
There is more evidence of him in pics after Sept 43.
The British have gone to great lengths to cover up the story.There is some evidence of the incident.
It lays in the grave of a known man.
 

Bry

New Member
Well, better than nothing! By the way, the archives of the OVRA are lacking a lot of documents, as usual for any intelligence service, even more when sensitive matters, like Fascism and collaboration to it, are involved. So it is not a surprise if your research will be very difficult, but I suggest you to go on with it and be as objective and clear as possible when you will publish it, choosing a good review o publisher for it.

Just think about the several discoveries of very important documents in private hands, when old people from WW2 died and their heirs finally opened their drawers, trunks, etc. The most known case is that of the "Alicicco papers", i.e. the documents given to Alicicco, an officer of the Army, by King Humbert II upon his departure for Lisbon in 1946. The heirs gave those papers (copies of Mussolini's documents, probably from his bags when he was captured by partisans) to the Archivio Centrale dello Stato about 20 years ago, but the heirs of the other officers who had received similar dossiers from the King haven't done the same, with their documents probably lost or destroyed.
I know the date
 

Bry

New Member
I wouldn't count on OVRA archives for anything.
They wrote down nothing and dog tags were not worn.
There is more evidence of him in pics after Sept 43.
The British have gone to great lengths to cover up the story.There is some evidence of the incident.
It lays in the grave of a known man.
The British National Archives are not above issuing outright false documents.
 

DrG

Member
The British National Archives are not above issuing outright false documents.
Well, they even pretended that genuine documents were fake, when this suicidal statement (an Archive denying the antenticity of its own documents!) suited their agenda (I am referring to the case of Martin Allen and Himmler's murder).
 
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